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Posts tagged “IE6

jQuery 2.0 Ditches IE 6, 7 and 8

Courtesy Keith Ward, Visual Studio Magazine

JavaScript library jQuery just turned 2.0. And it’s an especially significant release for .NET developers, as it jettisons some older Internet Explorer browsers and enhances support for writing Windows 8 applications.

The most important fact about jQuery 2.0 for Web developers is that IE 6, 7 and 8 are no longer supported. Dave Methvin, president of the jQuery Foundation, blogged that for sites that need to maintain compatibility with older IE browsers, the 1.x versions of jQuery will do just that, including an upcoming 1.10 version (1.9.1 was the last version of jQuery officially released). The older browsers, through the 1.x branch, will be supported for "several more years," Methvin wrote.

The time had come, however, to update jQuery for the modern Web, including Windows 8 apps, Google Chrome, Firefox OS apps, Chrome OS apps, Microsoft WebBrowser control and more. One advantage of the 2.0 release is that it’s 12 percent smaller than 1.9.1, owing to the removal of patches needed for IE 6, 7 and 8.

The major changes that needed to be made in jQuery 2.0 when it comes to Windows 8 apps were security related. Since all Windows Store apps have native access to the Windows Runtime, jQuery had to create a new security model, according to Microsoft’s Olivier Bloch, a senior technical evangelist, in a blog about 2.0. Jonathan Sampson, director of Support for appendTo, a company that’s contributed to jQuery, described the technical reasons:

"While jQuery meets the language criterion for Windows Store applications, Windows 8 exposes all the WinRT APIs within the HTML5 development environment, which comes with a new security model that made some code and common practices of jQuery flagged as unsafe in the context of a Windows Store application. AppendTo reviewed and re-authored portions of jQuery core to bring it into alignment with the Windows security model, as well as identified key areas where alternative patterns would need to be substituted for actually-used conventions."

jQuery is considered to be the most popular JavaScript library in use on the Internet. There areminified and unminified versions available, depending on a developer’s needs. Methvin strongly recommends upgrading via the jQuery Migrate plugin.

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Goodbye Support: Windows XP, IE 6, Office 2003

Courtesy Peter Bright,  Ars Techinica

Windows XP drops out of extended support on April 8, 2014. As of April 9, 2014, there will be no more security updates or other fixes made for the ancient operating system.

Joining it are Internet Explorer 6, Office 2003, and Exchange Server 2003. Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 2 will also end support on that day, but newer Service Packs will continue to be supported. Naturally, this also includes “Windows XP Mode” in Windows 7 and other virtualized solutions.

About 38 percent of Internet users are still using Windows XP. It’s unlikely that all of them will switch to Windows 7, Windows 8, or some other platform entirely by this time a year from now. It’s likely that some or all of them will see their computers exploited by malware as a result.

The threat of imminent insecurity—one hesitates to describe it as “imminent obsolescence,” as by any reasonable measure, Windows XP met that threshold years ago—is probably insufficient to make people stop using Windows XP today. It comes down to an unwillingness to replace systems that depend on the old software, both for economic or compatibility reasons.

Some hope that Microsoft will buckle under the pressure and further extend Windows XP’s supported lifetime. One has to question the value of such a move. If a company lacks any kind of migration or transition plan after eleven and a half years, it’s unlikely that another few months is going to make much difference.

Microsoft is still imploring customers to switch. At this point, it might be more effective to sigh heavily, and then tell Windows XP users to at least stop exposing their machines to the Internet. They might still get exploited through USB keys and similar attack vectors, but at least they won’t be able to propagate malware, participate in spam botnets, or be recruited for distributed denial of service attacks.