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Posts tagged “email

24/7 Support? Not In France

Courtesy FoxBusiness,com

Checking-Email-BlackBerry-Smartphone

French workers already have a 35-hour work week, five vacation weeks a year, and now, some aren’t allowed to be contacted by their employer after 6:00pm.

A new deal has been agreed upon between tech industry workers and unions in France that no longer requires employees to answer work-related emails after 6 p.m., according to reports. The deal reportedly includes one million workers in digital and consultancy sectors in the country. Tech giants Google (GOOG) and Facebook (FB) have operations in France.

This deal means workers won’t be under any pressure to respond to their higher-ups post-clocking out, and they can’t be reprimanded in the highly-unionized country.

Pam Villarreal, U.S. labor expert at the National Center for Policy Analysis, calls the deals “absurd.”

“Within the tech industry and digital consultancy sectors, there’s always something going wrong off the clock—when a computer goes down, it doesn’t go down between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.” she says. “Even though workers overwhelmingly support this, it will be interesting to see how it pans out in terms of productivity—knowing people who work in the tech industry, it’s one of the most likely where something goes wrong after hours.”

She adds the deal could bring the unintended consequence of higher labor costs in the country’s industry. “They may have to shift workers to after 5 p.m. to deal with these issues, so it may drive up the cost of labor.”

French tech workers aren’t the only ones getting a reprieve from the stress of a never-ending workday, as a Swedish city is experimenting with a six-hour workday, in an effort to improve productivity andhappiness among workers.

France also famously shortened its workweek to 35 hours instead of the standard 40, in 2000.

“They are likely trying to reduce the unemployment rate, which is at 8%, and almost 24% for those under 25,” Villarreal says of Sweden. “But we don’t know if the experiment will work—people will be trying to cram 8 hours of work into a 6-hour day.”

Villarreal says Swedish companies may also turn to outsourcing if labor costs climb, explain that France’s labor costs increased as a result of its shortened work week.

Neither move is likely to hit the U.S. anytime soon, Villarreal says, especially the no contact after work agreement.

“Think of big tech corporations—they wouldn’t agree to not contacting their employees after 6,” she says. “Google and Facebook are [probably] not so welcoming of this change in France. If it happened here, companies would probably try to outsource to India or China, countries without such strict labor regulations.”


Run your own e-mail server with your own domain, part 1

Courtesy , Ars Technica

E-mail is old and complex. It’s the oldest still-recognizable component of the Internet, with its modern incarnation having coalesced out of several different decades-old messaging technologies including ARPANET node-to-node messaging in the early 1970s. And though it remains a cornerstone of the Internet—the original killer app, really—it’s also extraordinarily hard to do right.

We most often interact with e-mail servers through friendly Web-based front-ends or applications, but a tremendous amount of work goes into hiding the complexity that allows the whole system to work. E-mail functions in a poisoned and hostile environment, flooded by viruses and spam. The seemingly simple exchange of text-based messages operates under complex rules with complex tools, all necessary to keep the poison out and the system functioning and useful in spite of the abuse it’s constantly under.

From a normal person’s perspective, e-mail seems like a solved problem: sign up for Internet access and your ISP gives you an e-mail address. Google, Apple, Yahoo, or any number of other free e-mail providers will hook you up with e-mail accounts with gigabytes of space and plenty of cool value-added features. Why do battle with arcane dragons to roll your own e-mail solution?

I’ll tell you why: because if it’s in the cloud, it’s not yours.

Enlarge / From my inbox. Wrong Ken Fisher, but still creepy, Google.

Because you must rely on others for your security. You have no control over who can read your correspondence—you must allow your data to be mined and your marketing profile extracted. You won’t be told if your metadata is collected or if your inbox is vacuumed up by a secret government request. You consent to be not a customer but a product, and a product has no rights.

Well, to hell with that. It’s your e-mail. And we’re going to take it back.

This is hard and even a bit scary…

E-mail is hard. If you want an easier sysadmin project, go set up a Web server. E-mail is a lot more complex, with many more moving parts. On the other hand, your correspondence with others is one of the most personal aspects of your online life—in a medium ultimately made of text, your words are you. It’s worth learning how to claw your online life back from those who would data mine and monetize it.

There are pitfalls and caveats—the biggest of which is that if you run your own e-mail server, you will be the sysadmin. The upside of this is that no bored or tired customer service rep about to go off-shift is going to fall for a social engineering attack and reset your e-mail password. The downside is that you are responsible for the care and feeding of your system. This is not an impossible task—it’s not even really difficult—but it is non-trivial and never-ending. Applying critical updates is your responsibility. When do critical updates come out? That’s your responsibility to keep track of, too.

Worst of all, if you screw up and your server is compromised or used as spam relay, your domain will almost certainly wind up on blacklists. Your ability to send and receive e-mail will be diminished or perhaps even eliminated altogether. And totally scrubbing yourself from the multitude of e-mail blacklists is about as difficult as trying to get off of the TSA’s No Fly list.

You have been warned.

…but it’s also worth doing

OK, that ought to be enough to scare away the people who aren’t serious. For those of you still with me: this is going to be a hell of a lot of fun, and you’re going to learn a lot.

This is going to be multi-part series, and here in this first part we’re going to ask (and answer) a bunch of questions about how we’re going to set our e-mail server up. We’ll also outline the applications we’re going to use and talk about what they do. We expect this series will run over the course of the next few weeks; unlike our series on setting up a Web server, though, you won’t be able to get started firing off e-mails after part 1—you need the whole thing in order for it all to work right.

This certainly isn’t the only DIY e-mail tutorial on the Web. If you’re eager to skip ahead and get started now, we suggest consulting Christoph Hass’ excellent tutorial on Workaround.org—he makes many (but nowhere near all) of the same configuration choices that we will be making. However, Ars wouldn’t be putting this guide together if we didn’t have a few tricks up our sleeves—we’ve been in an e-mail configuration cave for the past month, and we have a lot of good information to share.

Read More,,,

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/02/how-to-run-your-own-e-mail-server-with-your-own-domain-part-1/

 


DoJ now in favor of using search warrants to access user email.. Gee, How Nice!

Courtesy Engadget

The United States Justice Department seems to be listening to cries from Google (among others) that the 1986 ECPA (Electronic Communications Privacy Act) should be revised to reflect the vastly different universe that we now live in. DoJ attorney Elana Tyrangiel testified before the US House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations today, and in a nutshell, she now seems willing to think about the use of search warrants to access all types of email. Previously, the entity wanted the use a far less strict method for gaining access — giving less privacy to opened emails or emails that were over half a year old.

In part, she stated: "We agree, for example, that there is no principled basis to treat email less than 180 days old differently than email more than 180 days old. Similarly, it makes sense that the statute not accord lesser protection to opened emails than it gives to emails that are unopened." Certainly, this is a step in the right direction, but we’re a long way from having a genuine solution. We’ll be covering the saga as it unfolds, but for now, have a look at the full brief in the source below.